Where is my justice?

Huot Sarom, 69 years old, has been forced off all but one of her 5.67 hectares of land. "I have farmed my land since 1979, but they came to build a fence around it without informing me. I have filed complaints but no one came to resolve this issue". 

Huot Sarom, 69 years old, has been forced off all but one of her 5.67 hectares of land. "I have farmed my land since 1979, but they came to build a fence around it without informing me. I have filed complaints but no one came to resolve this issue". 

Ranked at 150 out of 168 in the Transparency International Corruption Index, Cambodia is one of the most corrupt countries in the world.

In this scenario, and considering the devastating consequences of the Khmer Rouge, it is not hard to image that human rights violations are common. 

"Prime Minister Hun Sen, a former Khmer Rouge commander, has been in power since 1985. His rule continues to rely on security force violence and politically motivated prosecutions. Security forces enjoy impunity for serious human rights abuses, including killings and torture. The government often restricts peaceful protests, and has imposed legislation regulating civil society and the internet that violates the rights to freedom of association and expression. Forced evictions and illegal land acquisitions by politically powerful individuals and their business partners cause social conflict. Government officials and judges are mired in corruption. Garment industry workers, who are mostly women, suffer sexual discrimination and other violations of their rights". Human Rights Watch

The Cambodia Center for Human Rights is one of the most important local organizations working to address these issues, and these twelve portraits were made for their 2014 Campaign Against Impunity in Cambodia. 

Ly Seav Minh's family has lived in their Boueng Kak I home since 1983. In 2012, a company registered a title over their land, but the family refused to accept compensation to relocate. "I was continually attacked and beaten, they tried to burn my home down, and they threw a cobra inside. Even though we have filled complaints, I feel that no one will find justice for us".

Ly Seav Minh's family has lived in their Boueng Kak I home since 1983. In 2012, a company registered a title over their land, but the family refused to accept compensation to relocate. "I was continually attacked and beaten, they tried to burn my home down, and they threw a cobra inside. Even though we have filled complaints, I feel that no one will find justice for us".

Mr. Sokun Sambath Piseth was monitoring a garment worker's strike near Yak Jin factory in January 2014 when he was beaten and had his arm broken by military forces. "I have not received Justice, and the military forces that violated my rights have not been punished. I was a victim, but I was put in prison". 

Mr. Sokun Sambath Piseth was monitoring a garment worker's strike near Yak Jin factory in January 2014 when he was beaten and had his arm broken by military forces. "I have not received Justice, and the military forces that violated my rights have not been punished. I was a victim, but I was put in prison". 

Vong Vorleak's mother, Eng Sokhom, was shot and killed by security forces during a garment factory protest n 2012. "When the accident happened, we were all here, and she was shot dead. If we try hard to demand justice, they will crackdown and threaten us. That's why I don't make a complaint". 

Vong Vorleak's mother, Eng Sokhom, was shot and killed by security forces during a garment factory protest n 2012. "When the accident happened, we were all here, and she was shot dead. If we try hard to demand justice, they will crackdown and threaten us. That's why I don't make a complaint". 

On 12 August 2014, Sngoun Noeun, a farmer from Kampong Chhang, was beaten whilst participating in a march to Phnom Penh. "We just marched to protect our land, yet security forces violently cracked down on us. They have never been arrested following their use of violence against citizens". 

On 12 August 2014, Sngoun Noeun, a farmer from Kampong Chhang, was beaten whilst participating in a march to Phnom Penh. "We just marched to protect our land, yet security forces violently cracked down on us. They have never been arrested following their use of violence against citizens". 

On 24 September 2014, Dy Vann drove across a private company's land in an attempt to harvest grass. He asked permission to cross the land, but they refused to allow him to proceed. They confiscated his motorbike and beat him with sticks. "I filed a complaint at the police station but they told me that they could not investigate it because the company is part of a powerful network". 

On 24 September 2014, Dy Vann drove across a private company's land in an attempt to harvest grass. He asked permission to cross the land, but they refused to allow him to proceed. They confiscated his motorbike and beat him with sticks. "I filed a complaint at the police station but they told me that they could not investigate it because the company is part of a powerful network". 

On 26 April 2012, Cheuy Oudorm's father, Chhut Vuthy, was fatally shot following a standoff with military police and logging company representatives in Koh Kong province. He was the founder and director of the Natural Resource Protection Group, and a strident activist against illegal logging. "Our greatest sorrow was when he died. The loss of my father has led us to struggle, my siblings can't access education and we are left with debt". 

On 26 April 2012, Cheuy Oudorm's father, Chhut Vuthy, was fatally shot following a standoff with military police and logging company representatives in Koh Kong province. He was the founder and director of the Natural Resource Protection Group, and a strident activist against illegal logging. "Our greatest sorrow was when he died. The loss of my father has led us to struggle, my siblings can't access education and we are left with debt". 

Mao Sarin, a hairdresser from Siem Reap, was dressed as a woman when he was arbitrarily arrested in 2012. He was detained overnight without charge. He is too fearful to file a complaint against the police. "The police threatened that if I didn't get on the motorbike, they would shoot me. They detained me overnight without reason". 

Mao Sarin, a hairdresser from Siem Reap, was dressed as a woman when he was arbitrarily arrested in 2012. He was detained overnight without charge. He is too fearful to file a complaint against the police. "The police threatened that if I didn't get on the motorbike, they would shoot me. They detained me overnight without reason". 

Oun Srey Pich, a transgender from Siem Reap, was arrested in October 2014 while she was walking with a friend. A transgender had stolen from a tourist, and as result many transgenders were arrested without sufficient evidences. "It is injustice because I never did anything wrong. Men and women are arrested with evidence, but transgender people are not". 

Oun Srey Pich, a transgender from Siem Reap, was arrested in October 2014 while she was walking with a friend. A transgender had stolen from a tourist, and as result many transgenders were arrested without sufficient evidences. "It is injustice because I never did anything wrong. Men and women are arrested with evidence, but transgender people are not". 

On 11 November 2012, Rong Panha joined a union march to submit a petition to Prime Minister Hun Sen's cabinet. When he called out for police officers to stop pushing some of the workers, police dragged him away and beat him. He was then arrested. No investigation was conducted into the actions of his attackers. "I tried to protect working conditions in Cambodia but the authorities aggressively attacked me". 

On 11 November 2012, Rong Panha joined a union march to submit a petition to Prime Minister Hun Sen's cabinet. When he called out for police officers to stop pushing some of the workers, police dragged him away and beat him. He was then arrested. No investigation was conducted into the actions of his attackers. "I tried to protect working conditions in Cambodia but the authorities aggressively attacked me". 

On 2nd of May 2014, reporter Lay Samean covered a rally held by the opposition party's supporters at Freedom Park in Phnom Penh. Upon attempting to take photographs of security guards chasing a monk, he was beaten and left unconscious. His vision has been permanently affected. "About six to seven security guards beaten me. I was kicked with their big boots and I lost consciousness. I haven't received justice yet because I am just a reporter".

On 2nd of May 2014, reporter Lay Samean covered a rally held by the opposition party's supporters at Freedom Park in Phnom Penh. Upon attempting to take photographs of security guards chasing a monk, he was beaten and left unconscious. His vision has been permanently affected. "About six to seven security guards beaten me. I was kicked with their big boots and I lost consciousness. I haven't received justice yet because I am just a reporter".

Chea Mony holds pictures of three murdered union leaders, his brother Chea Vichea (left), Hy Vuthy (middle) and Ros Sovanareath (right). "These assassination cases have not been investigated, and the police have arrested innocent people. Justice depends on the government's commitment to prosecute the perpetrators".  

Chea Mony holds pictures of three murdered union leaders, his brother Chea Vichea (left), Hy Vuthy (middle) and Ros Sovanareath (right). "These assassination cases have not been investigated, and the police have arrested innocent people. Justice depends on the government's commitment to prosecute the perpetrators".